How the Stratfordians Misrepresent Their Case

Here’s an excellent example of how the Stratfordians misrepresent the historical record:

Per The Shakespeare Authorship Page, Dedicated to the Proposition that Shakespeare Wrote Shakespeare , we are told:

Indeed, abundant evidence testifies to the fact that William Shakespeare of Stratford wrote the works published under his name… In their essay How We Know That Shakespeare Wrote Shakespeare: The Historical Facts, Tom Reedy and David Kathman summarize the extensive web of evidence that identifies William Shakespeare of Stratford as the man who wrote the works of William Shakespeare.

 Per Reedy and Kathman’s aforementioned essay:

1. The name “William Shakespeare” appears on the plays and poems. Good evidence that William Shakespeare wrote the plays and poems bearing his name is the fact that his name appears on them as the author.

Further, they note:

1d. Many plays were also attributed in print to William Shakespeare. Following is a list of the plays first published in quarto up until the publication of the First Folio, along with the dates of publication and the name of the author.

Whereby Reedy and Kathman proceed to list all such published quartos:

  • Titus Andronicus – Q1 1594, Q2 1600, Q3 1611, all with the author unnamed.
  • Henry VI Part 2 – Q1 1594, Q2 1600, both with the author unnamed, Q3 1619 by William Shakespeare, Gent.
  • Henry VI Part 3 – Q1 1595, Q2 1600, both with the author unnamed.
  • Romeo and Juliet – Q1 1597, Q2 1599, Q3 1609, all with the author unnamed.
  • Richard II – Q1 1597 with the author unnamed, Q2 1598, Q3 1598, Q4 1608, Q5 1615, all by William Shake-speare.
  • Richard III – Q1 1597 with the author unnamed, Q2 1598 by William Shake-speare, Q3 1602 by William Shakespeare, Q4 1605, Q5 1612, Q6 1622, all by William Shake-speare.
  • Love’s Labor’s Lost – Q1 1598 by W. Shakespeare.
  • Henry IV Part 1 – Q1 1598 with the author unnamed, Q2 1599, Q3 1604, Q4 1608, Q5 1613, all by W. Shake-speare.
  • Midsummer Night’s Dream – Q1 1600, Q2 1619, both by William Shakespeare.
  • Merchant of Venice – Q1 1600 by William Shakespeare, Q2 1619 by W. Shakespeare.
  • Henry IV Part 2 – Q1 1600 by William Shakespeare.
  • Much Ado About Nothing – Q1 1600 by William Shakespeare.
  • Henry V – Q1 1600, Q2 1602, Q3 1619, all with the author unnamed.
  • Merry Wives of Windsor – Q1 1602 by William Shakespeare, Q2 1619 by W. Shakespeare.
  • Hamlet – Q1 1603 by William Shake-speare, Q2 by William Shakespeare.
  • King Lear – Q1 1608 by M. William Shak-speare, Q2 1619 by M. William Shake-speare.
  • Pericles – Q1 1609, Q2 1609, Q3 1611, all by William Shakespeare, Q4 1619 by W. Shakespeare.
  • Troilus and Cressida – Q1 1609 by William Shakespeare.

However, isn’t it interesting that Mr. Reedy and Dr. Kathman neglected to include the following in their list of quartos as per their thesis, “Good evidence that William Shakespeare wrote the plays and poems bearing his name is the fact that his name appears on them as the author.”:

The London Prodigall – Q1 1605 by William Shakespeare.

A Yorkshire Tragedy – Q1 1608 by W. Shakspeare; entered into the Stationers’ Register on 2 May 1608 assigned to “William Shakespere.”

But yet they included Pericles, a play which was not included in the First Folio in 1623 but appeared in quarto in 1609 by William Shakespeare.

Why have Mr. Reedy and Dr. Kathman misrepresented their thesis by overlooking the historical facts?

© 2015 All Knitwits Reserved.

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About knitwitted

Goofette and troublemaker
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One Response to How the Stratfordians Misrepresent Their Case

  1. knitwitted says:

    Add to the list of plays missed by Reedy and Kathman: The Troublesome Reign of King John – Q1 1591, no author; Q2 1611, “W. Sh.”; Q3 1622, “W. Shakespeare.”

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